Key Points
  • Citizens, legislators, and regulators should separate the concept of public education from the monopolistic delivery system and embrace 21st-century methods of connecting students with learning experiences.
  • Legislators should improve or pass charter school laws, striking a balance between innovation, autonomy, and accountability.
  • Legislators should create or expand the type(s) of school choice program that best suits their state: vouchers, tax credit scholarships, homeschooling, and education savings accounts.
  • Legislators and regulatory agencies should be wary of attempts to re-regulate innovative and/or private educational options, which could expose them to the death of the thousand bureaucratic cuts and sacrifice the freedoms that allow them to succeed.
  • Institutions of higher education should be transparent about what outcomes students can expect and how much money they will have to spend or borrow.

An excellent education has long been recognized as key to the American Dream. Unfortunately, the current monopolistic and expensive K-12 education system is failing our students, leaving them unprepared for college, careers, or life. Similarly, our higher education system is leaving students with higher debt burdens and fewer career guarantees than ever before.

While the left argues that our ailing public education system can be fixed with ever-greater quantities of taxpayer dollars, the more than $600 billion we currently spend nationwide reflects a large increase in funds over the last 30 years, in exchange for total stagnation – or worse, declines – in achievement. On the college level, subsidies meant to help college students struggling to pay tuition have instead caused prices to skyrocket well above inflation.

Instead of throwing more money at the problem, it’s time to let parents take back control over their children’s educations by allowing them to apply competitive pressure to schools and educational providers. Innovative, parent-empowering choices such as charter schools, voucher programs, tax credit scholarships, homeschool, and education savings accounts allow each child the opportunity to reach his or her potential. In higher education, greater transparency is needed to ensure that students and parents know what they are paying for, and with what prospects they are likely to graduate.

Instead of endless top-down mandates, these revolutionary inroads into the education system are coming from the states. Forty-two states and the District of Columbia have laws on the books allowing charter schools to operate, while half the states have some form of private school choice program. The states should continue to expand parent choice and push educational institutions to compete with each other to provide the best product, just like providers of any other service.

Publications

+ All Education Publications

Model Policies

  • The Public School Financial Transparency Act Sunset Review

    The Public School Financial Transparency Act Summary The Public School Financial Transparency Act would require each local education provider in the state to create and maintain a searchable expenditure and revenue Web site database that includes detailed data of revenues and expenditures. It also would require …

  • Statement of Principles on School Safety and Security Draft

    I. Schools are a vital part of our national critical infrastructure. Nationally, there are about 100,000 K-12 public schools, serving about 50 million students and 6 million teachers and staff, for about 180 days of every year. They occupy over 2 million acres of public land and about 7.5 billion …

  • Informed Student Document Act Sunset Review

    Informed Student Document Act Summary To aid students and their parents, the Informed Student Document Act would publish the following outcomes by which a state’s universities can be compared: “Sticker-price” tuition relative to other institutions Net price, after grants and scholarships, relative to …

  • The Collegiate Learning Assessment Act Sunset Review

    The Collegiate Learning Assessment Act Summary This model policy requires public colleges and universities to administer the Collegiate Learning Assessment (CLA) to all students during their freshman and senior years. The schools would also be required to publish the results, broken down by academic majors.

  • Student Data Accessibility, Transparency, and Accountability Act Sunset Review

    Student Data Accessibility, Transparency, and Accountability Act Summary The Student Data Accessibility, Transparency, and Accountability Act would require the [State Board of Education/State Department of Education] to make publicly available an inventory and index of all data elements with definitions of individual student data fields …

  • Honest Transcript Act Sunset Review

    Honest Transcript Act Summary The Honest Transcript Act looks to correct grade inflation by requiring all public colleges and universities to include on student transcripts—alongside the individual grade the student received for each class—the average grade given by the professor for the entire class. This …

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Task Forces

Education and Workforce Development

The mission of the ALEC Education and Workforce Development Task Force is to promote excellence in the nation’s educational system, …

Press Releases

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